5 Tips on How to Learn Foreign Language with Dyslexia

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In terms of learning foreign languages, students with dyslexia are often disregarded as those that lack proper abilities to study another language besides their own. Yet, this assumption is rather far-fetched.

According to the Society for Neuroscience, almost 44 million American children and adults have dyslexia, and about 3.5% of American students already receive special education services for their special learning needs. So many U.S. citizens should not be deprived of the opportunity to learn a foreign language because of dyslexia, but many people simply don’t understand the specificity of this learning difficulty.

In general, dyslexia is defined as a specific learning difficulty that influences the way information is perceived. However, it doesn’t necessarily mean that a child or an adult with dyslexia cannot learn a foreign language. Dyslexia can have a significant impact on writing and reading skills, as it affects the way how information is perceived, organised, sequenced and stored, which can be difficult, taking into account that a good memory is a prerequisite of learning a foreign language successfully.

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Homeschooling with Dyslexia: How Dyslexics Learn

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While letting a child attend a regular schooling system can prove successful and helpful for the child, there is also a chance that it might simply not work out. Dyslexic children require a much more systematic and individualised learning process and sometimes a regular school might not be able to provide that.

Homeschooling allows the parent to create a learning process which is completely individual to the child’s needs and abilities. The child will feel much more at ease while learning with their parent and that can help the teaching process be more effective. In order to achieve a good result, the parent needs to be aware of just how a dyslexic child should learn.

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What is Dyslexia?

Photo by Jason Leung on Unsplash

Dyslexia is a Specific Learning Difficulty (SpLD) that affects the way information is learned and processed. It is a neurological difference and usually runs in families. Dyslexia occurs independently of intelligence. It can have a significant impact on education, especially when it comes to reading and writing.

Dyslexia is not only about literacy, even though weaknesses in literacy is often it’s the most visible sign. Dyslexia affects the way information is processed, stored and retrieved, affecting memory, the speed of processing, the perception of time, organisation and sequencing. Dyslexics may also have difficulty navigating a route or may mix up left and right.

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Jobs and Job Hunting Tips for People with Disabilities

Looking for a new job is stressful. When you have a disability, especially one that can’t be seen, it can be even more stressful. You may feel pressured to list your disability on your CV or be fearful of asking for accommodations after you’re hired if you don’t give them a heads up. But many of these fears are unfounded, and there are laws that make the job search less intimidating. There are also tons of jobs that are ideal for people with physical and neurological disabilities.

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Orthograph & Calcularis – Practical User Tips

Schools that use our learning programs not only use the software for children with learning disabilities, but for entire classes across the school.

The innovative learning programs train the basic skills in spelling and mathematics. They work multi-sensory and adapt individually to each learner. So all students can benefit from it. In order to make the use of our programs in the classroom as profitable as possible, we have put together a few tips, applications and lesson ideas for these schools.

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