How do the Orthograph learning games help children with dyslexia?

Orthograph software was developed around the concept of a link between dyslexia and difficulty in mapping spoken language to written language. This difficulty is known in neuroscience as the phonological deficit.

What does this phonological deficit look like? Basically, the brain areas responsible for automating phonological processing are less populated by neurons in people with dyslexia than in people without dyslexia. This means dyslexics have difficulty converting the spoken word to written, and the other way around.

The brain processes information through various channels. Dybuster Orthograph‘s concept is based on activating new channels for learning. Words are not just depicted as black letters on a white background but shown in specific sequences of colors, forms and sounds. The syllables within a word are presented in 3D, so that a spatial aspect is introduced into the learning process.

This is explained in more detail in this handy video we put together:

Using the program allows the brain to be able to link, process and combine the information from these newly activated channels. The result is that a dyslexic child is better able to map spoken language to written language and the phonological deficit we discussed above is decreased.

Results of using Dybuster OrthographIn a study involving 80 children, the results of using Orthograph software were compared against the progress of children who did not use the program. Playing through the learning games for a few months resulted in the users making 33% fewer spelling mistakes than previously.

Orthograph software can be tried for free: just click here to access the trial version. The games are meant not only to be fun but to allow dyslexic children to make lasting improvement in reading and spelling.