Get involved, make a difference

Last week we featured 18 year old Robert Lawrence and his fund-raising run for dyslexia. This got us thinking that some ddd readers interested in volunteering for dyslexics might like to be pointed towards a few possibilities.

Reach out: volunteer to help people with dyslexia.

Reach out: volunteer to help people with dyslexia.

If you are a parent of a dyslexic and based in the United States, the first website you might want to stop off at is DecodingDyslexia.net. This is the mother site of the organization and introduces you to a grassroots movement pushing for more educational intervention in the public school system. Led by parents, the movement is represented in all fifty states and each state has either an own website or social media presence or both. Contact the representative in your state to find out how to get involved.

For readers in the U.K., check out the British Dyslexia Association or DyslexiaScotland.org.uk. Here you can find information on everything from manning hotlines, fundraising, or as an employer how to make your office dyslexic-friendly.

Based in the Pacific region of the U.S.? Headstrong Nation is looking for a volunteer social media contributor to help manage the organization´s Facebook page. If you have killer writing skills, a flair for social media, and a passion for raising awareness of dyslexia then get in touch via the non-profit´s website.

For college and high school students who themselves have dyslexia or another learning disability, have a look at the Eye to Eye mentoring program. This organization matches mentors with young students in an art program, designed to provide mentees with both role models and a means of self-expression. To participate you do need to be enrolled at a school with a chapter of the program (full list available here) but should that not be the case and you are sufficiently determined then you can talk with Eye to Eye about opening a chapter at your school.

These are a few of our suggestions but you can come up with your own ways to help, just like Robert did with running. Open up your heart, your mind, and your time, and you can make a difference.