Edtech in developing countries

There is no doubt that education is one of the most potent tools for combatting poverty (see this U.N. report on Education First for more information). Yet the need for teachers, school supplies, and other resources remains dire in many countries.

We are going to be doing a series of posts on educational technology in developing countries here at the Dybuster blog. We warmly welcome readers to share their thoughts and experiences as we begin to explore this topic. Leave your comments at the end of a post or get in touch via our contact form.

Our first research on edtech in developing countries led us to the EduTech blog on the World Bank website. Written by Michael Trucano, the blog is a must-read for anyone looking for insights into the use of ICTs (information and communication technologies) around the world.

The post that initially led us to the blog was this one from 2014: In search of the ideal educational technology device for developing countries.

Trucano lists what he considers to be top considerations for designers looking to create devices for populations in developing countries. His first five priorities:

  • affordability
  • accessibility
  • connectivity
  • electricity
  • usability

Read through the article to get the full picture on each of these attributes. However the author’s perhaps most salient point comes right at the end:

If you really want good answers to these sorts of questions, you should ask the people themselves to whom you hope to sell such devices. Better yet: Work with them (observe them, talk with them, hire them, fund them) as part of your design process. 

Michael Trucano – Read more.

What do you think? What considerations should edtech designers and producers keep foremost in their minds as they look to create devices for developing countries?