Weekly Roundup: Dyscalculia & Dyslexia Success Stories

This Week’s Dyscalculia & Dyslexia Success Stories

Two success stories of persons affected by dyslexia have been trending in the news this week. The first article published in Quartz news outlet discusses the system behind the unconventional IKEA’s products titles. The founder of IKEA, Ingvar Kamprad, who is known to have suffered from dyscalculia, decided to name his products to avoid the challenging taping in of numeral product codes. This is how he invented a name system referencing specific semantic groups dependently on the range of the product to be titled. Bathroom articles for instance are named after Swedish lakes and bodies of water, whereas bed textiles refer to flowers and plants. Today IKEA is famous around the world for its unusual product names such as Grönkulla or Knutstorp, which positively contribute to the fame of the company.

The second success story recently being discussed in the news is the one of Loyle Carner – a London-based rapper. His fame is already worldwide – last week the Australian online magazine MusicFeeds published an interview discussing Carner’s career and how being dyslexic created his interest in poetry. Carner tells that writing at school, especially essays on literature, was extremely difficult because of the constant pressure to use correct spelling and grammar. Poetry, with its lesser emphasis on the form and focus on the phonetics, as well as meaning, gave him the possibility to express himself freely.

 

These examples show that dyscalculia & dyslexia are not automatically a hinderance and that the experience of being dyslexic or dyscalculic can also shape innovative approaches to common situations and create interests leading to extraordinary careers.

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Next Weeks events:

A2I Dyslexia – Inspired Dyslexic Artists Exhibition, UK

16th Feb 2017 – 11:00 to 15:00

Supporting Dyslexic learners in different contexts (For Professionals), UK

20th Feb 2017 – 9:30 to 16:30