Popular Math Apps in the Resource Classroom: Why I Chose Not To Use Them

This is a guest article from Special Education Teacher Monise Seward, you can find out more about her work on her website – http://www.moniseseward.com/

For the last 8 months, my IG and Twitter posts have focused on two main goals; find (a) Dyscalculia and Dyslexia training; and (b) Math Apps and/or curriculum designed with my students’ needs in mind. Both proved to be challenging and time-consuming endeavours, eventually I found one.

Dyscalculia is the Learning Disability you’ve probably never heard of, despite the fact that 5-10% of the population has it. Based on the challenges non-identified students experience, I believe there are more kids (and adults) with Dyscalculia. We simply characterize their struggles as ‘Math anxiety’; at least, in this country. Based on conversations had with U.S. teachers, few are aware of the existence of Dyscalculia. They are unable to identify the characteristics exhibited by students who may have it. Compounded by a lack of training on Dyscalculia, many teachers adhere to a pacing guide that does not allow time for remediation or accommodations.

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Dyslexia Intervention at Wings School Notts

Wings School Notts is part of the Kedleston Group and is an outstanding independent therapeutic residential provider with a specialist school on-site in a small quiet village in Nottinghamshire. Many of the young people who come to Wings School Notts have significant reading and writing difficulties however do not have a formal diagnosis. In other provisions, the young person may not get the correct level of intervention.

At Wings School Notts every new student starting has a specific dyslexia screening test, which is completed on a 1:1 basis by the special educational needs coordinator (SENCO) and school SEN Assistant in the bespoke Learning Zone/Library. 

This screening system allows the team at Wings Notts School to meet the individual needs of each young person in a specific and targeted way.
Following internal analysis, the results have shown that 65% of the children and young people in placement have traits of dyslexia which affects the way they learn. Impacts range between, a few signs, mild, moderate and severe.

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Dyscalculia – Spot The Signs

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Signs of Dyscalculia

It’s important to take signs of dyscalculia seriously. At the beginning of school, all children experience occasional difficulties with math. If these problems fail to dissipate with supported homework sessions or additional hours of practice, however, parents and teachers should be on alert for potential dyscalculia.

The following signs can indicate the presence of dyscalculia:


General well-being

  • …has anxiety about going to school
  • …has anxiety about taking tests

  • …has a negative perception of their own intelligence

  • …is withdrawn
  • …expects to fail
  • …displays frustration and a reluctance to try (maths) in other subjects
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Dyslexia – Spot the Signs

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It is important to spot signs of dyslexia early. The earlier this learning difficulty is diagnosed, the sooner an intervention can help children overcome it. This list from Dybuster can help you to identify the first signs that your child may need some help. You can also find more information about dyslexia and dyscalculia on their website.


Signs of Dyslexia

When children are first learning how to read and write, they make the same mistakes at varying degrees of frequency. For most children, the mistakes decrease in frequency after a short time and are eventually eliminated altogether. Children with dyslexia, on the other hand, make a significantly greater number of errors than their peers and the problems persist over a long period of time. What is particularly characteristic of dyslexia is the enormous inconsistency of these errors: it is often difficult to establish regular error patterns, and the errors occur without a common factor or any theme.


The following signs can indicate the presence of dyslexia:

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Dyscalculia – Identifying and Addressing it in Daily Life

Are you wondering why your child struggles with numbers and finds it difficult to solve the seemingly simple tasks?

Photo by Crissy Jarvis on Unsplash

Understanding Dyscalculia

Dyscalculia is usually perceived as a specific learning difficulty for mathematics, or, more appropriately, arithmetic. In isolated dyscalculia, there are no deficits in reading or writing. Dyscalculia is classified under WHO ICD-10, a classification system for diseases and mental disorders, as:


“The deficit concerns mastery of basic computational skills of
addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division rather than of the more
abstract mathematical skills involved in algebra, trigonometry,
geometry, or calculus.”


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5 Tips on How to Learn Foreign Language with Dyslexia

Photo by Josh Applegate on Unsplash

In terms of learning foreign languages, students with dyslexia are often disregarded as those that lack proper abilities to study another language besides their own. Yet, this assumption is rather far-fetched.

According to the Society for Neuroscience, almost 44 million American children and adults have dyslexia, and about 3.5% of American students already receive special education services for their special learning needs. So many U.S. citizens should not be deprived of the opportunity to learn a foreign language because of dyslexia, but many people simply don’t understand the specificity of this learning difficulty.

In general, dyslexia is defined as a specific learning difficulty that influences the way information is perceived. However, it doesn’t necessarily mean that a child or an adult with dyslexia cannot learn a foreign language. Dyslexia can have a significant impact on writing and reading skills, as it affects the way how information is perceived, organised, sequenced and stored, which can be difficult, taking into account that a good memory is a prerequisite of learning a foreign language successfully.

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Homeschooling with Dyslexia: How Dyslexics Learn

Photo by Aaron Burden on Unsplash

While letting a child attend a regular schooling system can prove successful and helpful for the child, there is also a chance that it might simply not work out. Dyslexic children require a much more systematic and individualised learning process and sometimes a regular school might not be able to provide that.

Homeschooling allows the parent to create a learning process which is completely individual to the child’s needs and abilities. The child will feel much more at ease while learning with their parent and that can help the teaching process be more effective. In order to achieve a good result, the parent needs to be aware of just how a dyslexic child should learn.

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What is Dyslexia?

Photo by Jason Leung on Unsplash

Dyslexia is a Specific Learning Difficulty (SpLD) that affects the way information is learned and processed. It is a neurological difference and usually runs in families. Dyslexia occurs independently of intelligence. It can have a significant impact on education, especially when it comes to reading and writing.

Dyslexia is not only about literacy, even though weaknesses in literacy is often it’s the most visible sign. Dyslexia affects the way information is processed, stored and retrieved, affecting memory, the speed of processing, the perception of time, organisation and sequencing. Dyslexics may also have difficulty navigating a route or may mix up left and right.

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Jobs and Job Hunting Tips for People with Disabilities

Looking for a new job is stressful. When you have a disability, especially one that can’t be seen, it can be even more stressful. You may feel pressured to list your disability on your CV or be fearful of asking for accommodations after you’re hired if you don’t give them a heads up. But many of these fears are unfounded, and there are laws that make the job search less intimidating. There are also tons of jobs that are ideal for people with physical and neurological disabilities.

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Orthograph & Calcularis – Practical User Tips

Schools that use our learning programs not only use the software for children with learning disabilities, but for entire classes across the school.

The innovative learning programs train the basic skills in spelling and mathematics. They work multi-sensory and adapt individually to each learner. So all students can benefit from it. In order to make the use of our programs in the classroom as profitable as possible, we have put together a few tips, applications and lesson ideas for these schools.

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