A Guide To Preparing For Parenthood With A Disability

Photo by bruce mars from Pexels

When you’re expecting a baby, it’s normal to spend hours on end thinking about the ways in which you will have to prepare your life and home for the arrival of a new family member. These anxieties are significantly amplified for expecting parents living with a disability. You may be keenly aware of how to adapt your life to your disability, but it’s not as obvious when you have to consider how a brand new life fits in.

But don’t worry – every parent goes through this. Your disability offers a different sort of challenge, but that doesn’t mean that preparing for parenthood has to be a logistical and emotional ordeal.

Read More»

Dyslexia in the Workplace

Photo by Perry Grone on Unsplash

Supporting Dyslexic Workers

Dyslexia isn’t just a challenge faced by children at school. Many professionals in the working world struggle with dyslexia on a daily basis. In fact, over 6 million adults in the U.K., or nearly 15% of the population over the age of 18 have dyslexia. With dyslexia, it can be more difficult to complete work or training sessions in a timely manner, and it can be challenging to connect with fellow employees. It’s crucial that workplaces take steps to help include and support differently abled employees, including those who have been diagnosed with dyslexia. Here are just a few of the ways that employers and co-workers can work to create a warm and welcoming environment for employees with dyslexia.

Read More»

“Once Upon a Time …” – Reading to Children Makes Them Happy and Smart!

Winter is coming … It’s time to cuddle up with stories and let your the imagination run wild.

Exciting, funny, disturbing, romantic and sometimes sad … For hundreds of years, stories have provided entertainment for all age groups. Stories are of great importance in the development of our children as they not only arouse emotions but also allow us to access empathy. We put together a collection of exciting links, events and get you thinking about what reading aloud could do for you and your children.

Read More»

How Technology Can Help (And Trouble) Workers With Dyslexia

Photo by Scott Webb on Unsplash

Between 5% and 12%of Europeans have dyslexia or an associated learning disorder, and for those who live with it, dyslexia continues to affect us in adulthood. Technology can be used to help children with dyslexia to work with their condition and develop ways to read and write. But unlike today’s dyslexic youth, adults with dyslexia don’t have any assistive technology specifically designed for them. In today’s online world, the space given by online communication and the speed at which online work-based communication happens can both help and hinder dyslexic adults. While word processors, spell-checkers, and online workspaces can benefit dyslexic adults, it can sometimes be overwhelming to receive information as quickly as it’s given in the ‘information age’.

Read More»

On Your Marks, Get Set, School!

Photo by STIL on Unsplash

Ready, Set, Go! Get Ready for the School Start

The summer holidays are sadly coming to an end. The adventurous days with family and friends, the long summer evenings outdoors and the enjoyable sleep in the next morning have made the last few weeks really great. So that nothing stands in the way of a successful re-entry into the school life, we have some tips for you.

Organisation, Organisation, Organisation!

Pencils sharpened, coloured pencils, ruler and protractor are ready, the first day of school is here! A new classroom, schoolbooks and unknown faces – a new school year always brings some changes and some challenges. The best way to support your child is to ensure that everything is prepared and organised to allow the first days to run as smoothly as possible.

Step one: Make sure that they have the necessary school supplies.

Step two: Clarify when any extracurricular activities take place and hang up the new timetable in a visible place in your home.

Read More»

Developmental Dyscalculia

Photo by Samuel Zeller on Unsplash

What is Developmental Dyscalculia?

Developmental dyscalculia can be either genetic or environmental and even an interaction of the two. It is a specific learning disability that affects the normal acquisition of arithmetic skills. It is equally common in boys and girls and impacts on 5-6% of the population.

Genetic Causes

Genetic causes include known genetic disorders such as Turner’s syndrome, Fragile X syndrome, Velocardiofacial syndrome, Williams syndrome. In addition studies suggest that there are genes present in the general population which increase the risk of dyscalculia.

Read More»

“The Wonders of Nature” – How Nature Strengthens our Well-being and Provides our Brains with the Necessary Rest

School, homework, music lessons, ballet, football training, an evening class…

All family homes are busy and active spaces, as we perform everyday life tasks in a growing family. Everything is run on a tight schedule, appointments are squeezed in and the children are busier than ever. However a recent study shows that over-organized activities can negatively affect children’s brains. That’s why many professionals are calling for a return to a more free and relaxed way of educating your child – a more outdoor and natural way.

Read More»

Hands Up! Why We Should Promote Visual Arithmetic

Photo by bady qb on Unsplash

It is well known that schools tend to put mental arithmetic skills above the visual ones, as something like counting with your fingers is seen as a weakness in one’s calculation abilities. Educators and scientists have been tackling this obsolete cliché with research and scientific reports that seem to prove that visual aids are more than just helpful in the learning process.

Indeed, visual aids, such as the use of fingers, have a key role in children’s understanding of mathematics. This form of visualisation gives the abstract world of numbers a real side and establishes a connection to something tangible. This results in the creation connections from the prefrontal cortex (main memory / data centre) to the visual and motor cortex. Thus, when visual aid is used, thinking becomes outsourced to other brain areas generating a more efficient use the brain’s capacity.

However, these findings do not mean that you child will forever use their fingers to count. Over time a mental image of the fingers will become connected to the mental processes of counting, making the physical counting unnecessary. This is proven by numerous studies with primary school children that measured increased activity in the visual cortex while children were solving complex math tasks, even when they did not use their hands.

Read More»

Websites Need To Be More Accessible

Access to information on the internet really can help improve the lives of people globally. Therefore assuring that your website is accessible for everyone is incredibly important. Of course, we can all wait for the multi-sensory internet of the future, but what can we do now to make our websites truly accessible?

Read More»

Financial Management for Seniors with Dyscalculia

Dyscalculia is a specific developmental disorder defined as difficulty acquiring basic arithmetic skills that is not explained by low intelligence or inadequate schooling. Unsurprisingly, many people with this disorder struggle to manage their finances well enough to build wealth. Seniors with dyscalculia face particular challenges. Dyscalculia does not improve without treatment, and seniors were most likely educated without the awareness of development disorders that has begun to penetrate into the school system in the last few decades. Moreover, these days, financial management often requires the use of technology. Seniors are often less familiar with the technological tools needed and dyscalculia makes it difficult to learn. Here are some tips on financial management when living with dyscalculia.

Read More»
© Copyright Dybuster blog – edtech, dyslexia, dsycalculia - Theme by Pexeto