Dyscalculia – Spot The Signs

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Signs of Dyscalculia

It’s important to take signs of dyscalculia seriously. At the beginning of school, all children experience occasional difficulties with math. If these problems fail to dissipate with supported homework sessions or additional hours of practice, however, parents and teachers should be on alert for potential dyscalculia.

The following signs can indicate the presence of dyscalculia:


General well-being

  • …has anxiety about going to school
  • …has anxiety about taking tests

  • …has a negative perception of their own intelligence

  • …is withdrawn
  • …expects to fail
  • …displays frustration and a reluctance to try (maths) in other subjects
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Dyscalculia – Identifying and Addressing it in Daily Life

Are you wondering why your child struggles with numbers and finds it difficult to solve the seemingly simple tasks?

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Understanding Dyscalculia

Dyscalculia is usually perceived as a specific learning difficulty for mathematics, or, more appropriately, arithmetic. In isolated dyscalculia, there are no deficits in reading or writing. Dyscalculia is classified under WHO ICD-10, a classification system for diseases and mental disorders, as:


“The deficit concerns mastery of basic computational skills of
addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division rather than of the more
abstract mathematical skills involved in algebra, trigonometry,
geometry, or calculus.”


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Orthograph & Calcularis – Practical User Tips

Schools that use our learning programs not only use the software for children with learning disabilities, but for entire classes across the school.

The innovative learning programs train the basic skills in spelling and mathematics. They work multi-sensory and adapt individually to each learner. So all students can benefit from it. In order to make the use of our programs in the classroom as profitable as possible, we have put together a few tips, applications and lesson ideas for these schools.

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Upcoming Dyslexia, Dyscalculia and EdTech Conferences 2019

Looking to connect with other dyslexia and dyscalculia therapists, educators, psychologists? Or wanting to exchange experiences with other parents of children with learning disabilities? There are a number of conferences coming up in 2019 focused on dyslexia and dyscalculia. Have a look at the list below!


Dyslexia Association of Singapore – Preschool Seminar 2019

20th March – Singapore, SG

Back by popular demand for the 7th year, the Preschool Seminar 2019 is a seminar organised by Preschool professionals from Specialised Educational Services (SES), a division of the Dyslexia Association of Singapore. 

Preschool practitioners from the Dyslexia Association of Singapore will share about educating the young ones and also tips and tricks to support the weaker learners. Featuring two keynote speakers who will discuss social-emotional competence as well as learning in young children, the Preschool Seminar 2019 also includes 4 breakout workshops in various topics.

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Open call – Looking for Schools to Trial Calcularis and Orthograph!

Great news!

We are looking for primary schools in the UK to trial our Dybuster softwares! You will receive the softwares for free for the duration of the 1 to 3 months. These softwares will help your pupils to tackle their learning difficulties such as dyslexia and dyscalculia in an interactive and fun way. There is no obligation to subscribe afterwards, but we would love some feedback! Interested?

Contact us here

Calcularis Discovery Licence

Get to know us! Dybuster just launched the Discovery Licence so you can try out Dybuster’s learning software Calcularis. Only £29 for three months!

Calcularis promotes development and interaction between different brain areas, such as the ones processing numbers, quantities, and mathematical problems. Aiming to reduce math anxiety, the software makes numbers a more enjoyable part of everyday life.

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Dyscalculia Blog’s New Years Resolutions

The Dyscalculia Blog has just shared a list of New Year’s resolutions that could help you to tackle your learning difficulty. People who have dyslexia also have a 40% chance of having dyscalculia, so it’s worth learning more about it. The resolution list below is a good start to help you make 2019 the best year yet!

Photo by Brooke Lark on Unsplash
Photo by Brooke Lark on Unsplash

Acknowledge the diagnosis and take action

The first step in engaging with a learning difficulty is acknowledging that your brain works differently. However this does not mean that you cannot use that brain to overcome the diagnosis you have. Be confident and take action to tackle your difficulties! There are many ways to train yourself and you can find many tips on this blog.

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A Guide To Preparing For Parenthood With A Disability

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When you’re expecting a baby, it’s normal to spend hours on end thinking about the ways in which you will have to prepare your life and home for the arrival of a new family member. These anxieties are significantly amplified for expecting parents living with a disability. You may be keenly aware of how to adapt your life to your disability, but it’s not as obvious when you have to consider how a brand new life fits in.

But don’t worry – every parent goes through this. Your disability offers a different sort of challenge, but that doesn’t mean that preparing for parenthood has to be a logistical and emotional ordeal.

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Developmental Dyscalculia

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What is Developmental Dyscalculia?

Developmental dyscalculia can be either genetic or environmental and even an interaction of the two. It is a specific learning disability that affects the normal acquisition of arithmetic skills. It is equally common in boys and girls and impacts on 5-6% of the population.

Genetic Causes

Genetic causes include known genetic disorders such as Turner’s syndrome, Fragile X syndrome, Velocardiofacial syndrome, Williams syndrome. In addition studies suggest that there are genes present in the general population which increase the risk of dyscalculia.

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“The Wonders of Nature” – How Nature Strengthens our Well-being and Provides our Brains with the Necessary Rest

School, homework, music lessons, ballet, football training, an evening class…

All family homes are busy and active spaces, as we perform everyday life tasks in a growing family. Everything is run on a tight schedule, appointments are squeezed in and the children are busier than ever. However a recent study shows that over-organized activities can negatively affect children’s brains. That’s why many professionals are calling for a return to a more free and relaxed way of educating your child – a more outdoor and natural way.

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