Dyslexia – Spot the Signs

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It is important to spot signs of dyslexia early. The earlier this learning difficulty is diagnosed, the sooner an intervention can help children overcome it. This list from Dybuster can help you to identify the first signs that your child may need some help. You can also find more information about dyslexia and dyscalculia on their website.


Signs of Dyslexia

When children are first learning how to read and write, they make the same mistakes at varying degrees of frequency. For most children, the mistakes decrease in frequency after a short time and are eventually eliminated altogether. Children with dyslexia, on the other hand, make a significantly greater number of errors than their peers and the problems persist over a long period of time. What is particularly characteristic of dyslexia is the enormous inconsistency of these errors: it is often difficult to establish regular error patterns, and the errors occur without a common factor or any theme.


The following signs can indicate the presence of dyslexia:

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5 Tips on How to Learn Foreign Language with Dyslexia

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In terms of learning foreign languages, students with dyslexia are often disregarded as those that lack proper abilities to study another language besides their own. Yet, this assumption is rather far-fetched.

According to the Society for Neuroscience, almost 44 million American children and adults have dyslexia, and about 3.5% of American students already receive special education services for their special learning needs. So many U.S. citizens should not be deprived of the opportunity to learn a foreign language because of dyslexia, but many people simply don’t understand the specificity of this learning difficulty.

In general, dyslexia is defined as a specific learning difficulty that influences the way information is perceived. However, it doesn’t necessarily mean that a child or an adult with dyslexia cannot learn a foreign language. Dyslexia can have a significant impact on writing and reading skills, as it affects the way how information is perceived, organised, sequenced and stored, which can be difficult, taking into account that a good memory is a prerequisite of learning a foreign language successfully.

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Homeschooling with Dyslexia: How Dyslexics Learn

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While letting a child attend a regular schooling system can prove successful and helpful for the child, there is also a chance that it might simply not work out. Dyslexic children require a much more systematic and individualised learning process and sometimes a regular school might not be able to provide that.

Homeschooling allows the parent to create a learning process which is completely individual to the child’s needs and abilities. The child will feel much more at ease while learning with their parent and that can help the teaching process be more effective. In order to achieve a good result, the parent needs to be aware of just how a dyslexic child should learn.

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What is Dyslexia?

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Dyslexia is a Specific Learning Difficulty (SpLD) that affects the way information is learned and processed. It is a neurological difference and usually runs in families. Dyslexia occurs independently of intelligence. It can have a significant impact on education, especially when it comes to reading and writing.

Dyslexia is not only about literacy, even though weaknesses in literacy is often it’s the most visible sign. Dyslexia affects the way information is processed, stored and retrieved, affecting memory, the speed of processing, the perception of time, organisation and sequencing. Dyslexics may also have difficulty navigating a route or may mix up left and right.

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Orthograph & Calcularis – Practical User Tips

Schools that use our learning programs not only use the software for children with learning disabilities, but for entire classes across the school.

The innovative learning programs train the basic skills in spelling and mathematics. They work multi-sensory and adapt individually to each learner. So all students can benefit from it. In order to make the use of our programs in the classroom as profitable as possible, we have put together a few tips, applications and lesson ideas for these schools.

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Upcoming Dyslexia, Dyscalculia and EdTech Conferences 2019

Looking to connect with other dyslexia and dyscalculia therapists, educators, psychologists? Or wanting to exchange experiences with other parents of children with learning disabilities? There are a number of conferences coming up in 2019 focused on dyslexia and dyscalculia. Have a look at the list below!


Dyslexia Association of Singapore – Preschool Seminar 2019

20th March – Singapore, SG

Back by popular demand for the 7th year, the Preschool Seminar 2019 is a seminar organised by Preschool professionals from Specialised Educational Services (SES), a division of the Dyslexia Association of Singapore. 

Preschool practitioners from the Dyslexia Association of Singapore will share about educating the young ones and also tips and tricks to support the weaker learners. Featuring two keynote speakers who will discuss social-emotional competence as well as learning in young children, the Preschool Seminar 2019 also includes 4 breakout workshops in various topics.

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Open call – Looking for Schools to Trial Calcularis and Orthograph!

Great news!

We are looking for primary schools in the UK to trial our Dybuster softwares! You will receive the softwares for free for the duration of the 1 to 3 months. These softwares will help your pupils to tackle their learning difficulties such as dyslexia and dyscalculia in an interactive and fun way. There is no obligation to subscribe afterwards, but we would love some feedback! Interested?

Contact us here

Dyscalculia Blog’s New Years Resolutions

The Dyscalculia Blog has just shared a list of New Year’s resolutions that could help you to tackle your learning difficulty. People who have dyslexia also have a 40% chance of having dyscalculia, so it’s worth learning more about it. The resolution list below is a good start to help you make 2019 the best year yet!

Photo by Brooke Lark on Unsplash
Photo by Brooke Lark on Unsplash

Acknowledge the diagnosis and take action

The first step in engaging with a learning difficulty is acknowledging that your brain works differently. However this does not mean that you cannot use that brain to overcome the diagnosis you have. Be confident and take action to tackle your difficulties! There are many ways to train yourself and you can find many tips on this blog.

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Top 3 Speed Reading Tips for Dyslexic Readers

Dyslexia is a learning disability. It affects a person’s abilities with reading, writing, and spelling. A person with dyslexia may find it difficult to recognise sounds of certain words and letters, correct spellings, difficulty in understanding sequence of directions, they find it difficult to understand information or instructions that are written down then told verbally, and they get confused between certain letters like ‘b’ and’. However, people with dyslexia are good at creative thinking and problem-solving skills. Everyone should understand that dyslexia is not related to a person’s intelligence level but their ability with learning.

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You Can Boost Your Concentration Through Music

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A study done by Stanford University showed that music has a direct link with the brain, affecting areas to do with the memory, making predictions and paying attention. If you are living with dyslexia, this is extremely relevant. The majority of dyslexics have difficulties with attention and concentration, as well as processing. This can result in problems prioritising and completing tasks, as well as an overall feeling of “losing time.” So how can listening to music help with this?

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