What is Dyslexia and how can Technology Help with its Symptoms?

What is Dyslexia?

Dyslexia is a learning disorder that results in reading and writing difficulties. Dyslexia is found in populations around the world, however rates can be particularly high in countries where the written language uses irregular spelling or features combinations of letters with different sound possibilities. English is full of these combinations (such as the ‘ou’ in cough and through) as well as different spellings that all make the same sound (such as the ‘o’ sound in stole, coal, and bowl). It is estimated that 15% of the U.S. population suffers from dyslexia.

Dyslexic people have chronic difficulty with reading, writing, and spelling. Despite being bright and motivated, a child with dyslexia will have great difficulty making connections between spoken and written language. Dyslexics may be intelligent and creative people but suffer from low self-esteem or anxiety brought on by their learning disability.

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How Soon Should You Start Reading With Your Child?

Photo by Bonnie Kittle on Unsplash

You can’t start early enough

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics you can’t start early enough! Reading with a child in early infancy can boost vocabulary and reading skills four years later, before the start of school.

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Top 5 Myths of Dyscalculia & Dyslexia

http://guillellano.com/All kids who reverse their b’s & d’s or their numbers have dyslexia or dyscalculia.

Failure to read or do maths is often more to do with the nature of teaching rather than the nature of the child. A child will not develop dyslexia or dyscalculia because he has trouble reading.

Multi-sensory exercises can help struggling students to strengthen their brain activity, but this will not cure their dyslexia or dyscalculia.

It is also not a dietary problem. No amount of healthy green juices, or other wholesome foods will reverse the conditions, but that does not mean you can eat unhealthily! In fact a healthy diet can improve your concentration and may help you control the conditions, so keep eating those greens, its and seeds!

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Dybuster’s Top 5 Blog Posts on Dyslexia

Dyslexia is a learning disorder that results in reading and writing difficulties. Dyslexia is found in populations around the world but rates can be particularly high in countries where the written language uses irregular spelling or features combinations of letters with different sound possibilities. English is full of these combinations (such as the ou in cough and through) as well as different spellings that all make the same sound (such as the o sound in stole, coal, and bowl). It is estimated that 15% of the U.S. population suffers from dyslexia.

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Make Dyslexia, Dyspraxia and Dyscalculia Testing Free on the NHS.

Photo Credit: KootenaiUrgentCare Flickr via Compfight cc

An important step has been taken by British citizens who started a petition aiming to make dyslexia, dyspraxia and dyscalculia testing free on the National Health Service (NHS) in the UK.

Today a cost of such test costs around £500, which is not affordable for many British families. While schools may help with the costs of a test if they believe one is necessary, they are not obliged to do so. Therefore many young British children are not diagnosed at a young age, leading them to have difficulties while learning, feeling discouraged and in some cases being bullied by their classmates.

Diagnosing learning disabilities at an early age needs to be a national goal and would help many children and avoid mental health issues in the future.

If you are eligible, please don’t to forget to sign the petition here.

Our Top 5 Posts on Dyslexia

searching for words: what to call dyslexiaFor this week’s post we went back into the blog archives to find our content on dyslexia that has proved most useful to our readers. We’d like to share these articles here as the ones that, going by popularity and response in the comments, resonate the most with our audience. Thank you for reading!

1. Searching for words: what to call dyslexia

This post provoked some interesting discussion in the comments section. We asked readers what they thought of referring to dyslexia as a learning disability vs. a learning difference.

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What Is Multi-Sensory Learning?

Multi-sensory learning with shapes, color, touch

If you’ve spent any time reading up on interventions for learning disabilities then you have probably come across the term multi-sensory learning. The phrase pops up fairly often in descriptions of dyslexia therapies, for example. But what exactly is multi-sensory learning, other than a buzzword? Read on to find out.

We absorb information in many different ways. Sometimes we learn by seeing, such as when we read a text. Or we may learn by hearing, as when a teacher explains a lesson to us.

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Dyslexia: After the Diagnosis

dybuster guide after dyslexia diagnosis

Looking for guidance? Check out these resources for what to do after a dyslexia diagnosis.

If you or your child have just been diagnosed with dyslexia, the first question you might ask is: “So now what?”

We’ve put together a list of online resources that can help guide you through the post-diagnosis phase. Ready? Let’s start the journey:

Quick overview

If you need some quick guidance on what to expect and what steps to take, have a look this resource from UnderstoodMy Child Was Just Diagnosed With Dyslexia. Now What?

The article takes the reader through ten steps on what do after a child has been diagnosed with dyslexia. From exploring therapies to liaising with schools to how to talk to the child herself, the article provides concrete tips on these and more issues.

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Educational Technology for Learning Disabilities: Dybuster LinkedIn Discussion Group

dybuster linkedin educational technology for learning disabilities

Looking for discussion and debate on educational topics? Like to keep up-to-date on educational technology? Or maybe you want to share your knowledge and experiences regarding learning differences?

We’ve launched a LinkedIn discussion group to addresses all of these needs and more. With new members added weekly, we hope the group will provide information and resources, professional networking, and food for thought.

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Dybuster User Studies: How Effective is Orthograph?

Dybuster‘s software Orthograph was developed in collaboration with the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology. The principles behind the software came from neuroscience and computer science. An important part of the development process was rigorous user testing: how well did the software actually work? Did Orthograph really help dyslexics improve their spelling and reading.

First case study

The first study on Dybuster software was published in 2007. Eighty children between the ages of nine and eleven took part in the study, which was led by neuropsychologists Prof. Dr. Lutz Jäncke and Prof. M. Meyer. The participants included both children with dyslexia and children without.

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