A Guide To Preparing For Parenthood With A Disability

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When you’re expecting a baby, it’s normal to spend hours on end thinking about the ways in which you will have to prepare your life and home for the arrival of a new family member. These anxieties are significantly amplified for expecting parents living with a disability. You may be keenly aware of how to adapt your life to your disability, but it’s not as obvious when you have to consider how a brand new life fits in.

But don’t worry – every parent goes through this. Your disability offers a different sort of challenge, but that doesn’t mean that preparing for parenthood has to be a logistical and emotional ordeal.

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Dyslexia in the Workplace

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Supporting Dyslexic Workers

Dyslexia isn’t just a challenge faced by children at school. Many professionals in the working world struggle with dyslexia on a daily basis. In fact, over 6 million adults in the U.K., or nearly 15% of the population over the age of 18 have dyslexia. With dyslexia, it can be more difficult to complete work or training sessions in a timely manner, and it can be challenging to connect with fellow employees. It’s crucial that workplaces take steps to help include and support differently abled employees, including those who have been diagnosed with dyslexia. Here are just a few of the ways that employers and co-workers can work to create a warm and welcoming environment for employees with dyslexia.

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“Once Upon a Time …” – Reading to Children Makes Them Happy and Smart!

Winter is coming … It’s time to cuddle up with stories and let your the imagination run wild.

Exciting, funny, disturbing, romantic and sometimes sad … For hundreds of years, stories have provided entertainment for all age groups. Stories are of great importance in the development of our children as they not only arouse emotions but also allow us to access empathy. We put together a collection of exciting links, events and get you thinking about what reading aloud could do for you and your children.

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How Technology Can Help (And Trouble) Workers With Dyslexia

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Between 5% and 12%of Europeans have dyslexia or an associated learning disorder, and for those who live with it, dyslexia continues to affect us in adulthood. Technology can be used to help children with dyslexia to work with their condition and develop ways to read and write. But unlike today’s dyslexic youth, adults with dyslexia don’t have any assistive technology specifically designed for them. In today’s online world, the space given by online communication and the speed at which online work-based communication happens can both help and hinder dyslexic adults. While word processors, spell-checkers, and online workspaces can benefit dyslexic adults, it can sometimes be overwhelming to receive information as quickly as it’s given in the ‘information age’.

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“The Wonders of Nature” – How Nature Strengthens our Well-being and Provides our Brains with the Necessary Rest

School, homework, music lessons, ballet, football training, an evening class…

All family homes are busy and active spaces, as we perform everyday life tasks in a growing family. Everything is run on a tight schedule, appointments are squeezed in and the children are busier than ever. However a recent study shows that over-organized activities can negatively affect children’s brains. That’s why many professionals are calling for a return to a more free and relaxed way of educating your child – a more outdoor and natural way.

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The Complete Guide To Safe Internet Use For Seniors With Dyslexia & Dyscalculia

If you are not online, you can forget about keeping in touch with your grandchildren. That is just the reality we are living in. However, for seniors living with dyscalculia or dyslexia, using the internet can be incredibly stressful and even dangerous. To help you with this necessary form of communication, we have put together a comprehensive guide to make the experience less stressful and more fun.

How Dyscalculia and Dyslexia Affects People Later in Life

Most of the media attention on dyscalculia and dyslexia is focused on how these maladies affect youngsters. Yet, older adults also have trouble living a normal life and performing specific activities when they are afflicted by these disabilities. In turn, this can cause undue frustration and stress.

Seniors who acquire dyslexia and dyscalculia later in life often do so through trauma, dementia, stroke, or brain injury. For dementia and stroke, stress is typically a contributing factor. When stress is the source of dyslexia or dyscalculia, a dangerous cycle develops.

As dyscalculics and dyslexics put in extra effort to deal with numbers, math, and reading, they get frustrated and mentally-exhausted. This added stress can lead to other health issues or worsen the condition. Unfortunately, trying to use the internet is one of the more stressful experiences for seniors, especially with all of the scammers out there trying to prey on your inexperience. Thankfully, there are some steps you can take to stay safe on the internet and avoid the added stress.

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Top 5 Dyslexia Ted Talks

1. Aditi Shankardass – A Second Opinion On Learning Disorders

Aditi Shankardass looks at developmental disorders in children, which are typically diagnosed through the observation of the child’s behaviour. She suggests that it is necessary to not stop there and also study brain reactions. She tells a story of misdiagnosis and how correcting these have transformed children’s lives.

 

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What is Dyslexia and how can Technology Help with its Symptoms?

What is Dyslexia?

Dyslexia is a learning disorder that results in reading and writing difficulties. Dyslexia is found in populations around the world, however rates can be particularly high in countries where the written language uses irregular spelling or features combinations of letters with different sound possibilities. English is full of these combinations (such as the ‘ou’ in cough and through) as well as different spellings that all make the same sound (such as the ‘o’ sound in stole, coal, and bowl). It is estimated that 15% of the U.S. population suffers from dyslexia.

Dyslexic people have chronic difficulty with reading, writing, and spelling. Despite being bright and motivated, a child with dyslexia will have great difficulty making connections between spoken and written language. Dyslexics may be intelligent and creative people but suffer from low self-esteem or anxiety brought on by their learning disability.

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How Soon Should You Start Reading With Your Child?

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You can’t start early enough

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics you can’t start early enough! Reading with a child in early infancy can boost vocabulary and reading skills four years later, before the start of school.

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Top 5 Myths of Dyscalculia & Dyslexia

http://guillellano.com/All kids who reverse their b’s & d’s or their numbers have dyslexia or dyscalculia.

Failure to read or do maths is often more to do with the nature of teaching rather than the nature of the child. A child will not develop dyslexia or dyscalculia because he has trouble reading.

Multi-sensory exercises can help struggling students to strengthen their brain activity, but this will not cure their dyslexia or dyscalculia.

It is also not a dietary problem. No amount of healthy green juices, or other wholesome foods will reverse the conditions, but that does not mean you can eat unhealthily! In fact a healthy diet can improve your concentration and may help you control the conditions, so keep eating those greens, its and seeds!

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