Dybuster’s Top 5 Blog Posts on Dyslexia

Dyslexia is a learning disorder that results in reading and writing difficulties. Dyslexia is found in populations around the world but rates can be particularly high in countries where the written language uses irregular spelling or features combinations of letters with different sound possibilities. English is full of these combinations (such as the ou in cough and through) as well as different spellings that all make the same sound (such as the o sound in stole, coal, and bowl). It is estimated that 15% of the U.S. population suffers from dyslexia.

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Make Dyslexia, Dyspraxia and Dyscalculia Testing Free on the NHS.

Photo Credit: KootenaiUrgentCare Flickr via Compfight cc

An important step has been taken by British citizens who started a petition aiming to make dyslexia, dyspraxia and dyscalculia testing free on the National Health Service (NHS) in the UK.

Today a cost of such test costs around £500, which is not affordable for many British families. While schools may help with the costs of a test if they believe one is necessary, they are not obliged to do so. Therefore many young British children are not diagnosed at a young age, leading them to have difficulties while learning, feeling discouraged and in some cases being bullied by their classmates.

Diagnosing learning disabilities at an early age needs to be a national goal and would help many children and avoid mental health issues in the future.

If you are eligible, please don’t to forget to sign the petition here.

Our Top 5 Posts on Dyslexia

searching for words: what to call dyslexiaFor this week’s post we went back into the blog archives to find our content on dyslexia that has proved most useful to our readers. We’d like to share these articles here as the ones that, going by popularity and response in the comments, resonate the most with our audience. Thank you for reading!

1. Searching for words: what to call dyslexia

This post provoked some interesting discussion in the comments section. We asked readers what they thought of referring to dyslexia as a learning disability vs. a learning difference.

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What Is Multi-Sensory Learning?

Multi-sensory learning with shapes, color, touch

If you’ve spent any time reading up on interventions for learning disabilities then you have probably come across the term multi-sensory learning. The phrase pops up fairly often in descriptions of dyslexia therapies, for example. But what exactly is multi-sensory learning, other than a buzzword? Read on to find out.

We absorb information in many different ways. Sometimes we learn by seeing, such as when we read a text. Or we may learn by hearing, as when a teacher explains a lesson to us.

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Dyslexia: After the Diagnosis

dybuster guide after dyslexia diagnosis

Looking for guidance? Check out these resources for what to do after a dyslexia diagnosis.

If you or your child have just been diagnosed with dyslexia, the first question you might ask is: “So now what?”

We’ve put together a list of online resources that can help guide you through the post-diagnosis phase. Ready? Let’s start the journey:

Quick overview

If you need some quick guidance on what to expect and what steps to take, have a look this resource from UnderstoodMy Child Was Just Diagnosed With Dyslexia. Now What?

The article takes the reader through ten steps on what do after a child has been diagnosed with dyslexia. From exploring therapies to liaising with schools to how to talk to the child herself, the article provides concrete tips on these and more issues.

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Educational Technology for Learning Disabilities: Dybuster LinkedIn Discussion Group

dybuster linkedin educational technology for learning disabilities

Looking for discussion and debate on educational topics? Like to keep up-to-date on educational technology? Or maybe you want to share your knowledge and experiences regarding learning differences?

We’ve launched a LinkedIn discussion group to addresses all of these needs and more. With new members added weekly, we hope the group will provide information and resources, professional networking, and food for thought.

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Dybuster User Studies: How Effective is Orthograph?

Dybuster‘s software Orthograph was developed in collaboration with the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology. The principles behind the software came from neuroscience and computer science. An important part of the development process was rigorous user testing: how well did the software actually work? Did Orthograph really help dyslexics improve their spelling and reading.

First case study

The first study on Dybuster software was published in 2007. Eighty children between the ages of nine and eleven took part in the study, which was led by neuropsychologists Prof. Dr. Lutz Jäncke and Prof. M. Meyer. The participants included both children with dyslexia and children without.

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Dybuster Colour Game – Using Colours to Map Letters to Sounds

Multi-sensory learning helps students approach a subject like spelling or maths through the use of different senses. When playing the Colour Game in Orthograph, Dybuster’s software for children with dyslexia, students associate letters with colours and also with sound. This activates new learning channels in the brain and helps children to map spoken sound to written letters, something that is difficult for dyslexics.

The video below shows the game in action and provides a voice-over guide. You can test the game yourself for free by visiting the Orthograph Trial page. No download is necessary; you can access the program in your browser.

Guest Post: The Disability Co-operative Network

Our guest post this week is written by Becki Morris, who “works in and loves museums” and is passionate about “museum access for people with neurodiversity, including dyslexia and dyspraxia”. Discover the Disability Co-operative Network and their work in making museums more accessible to people with disabilities.

glass bridgeThe Disability Co-operative Network was launched on 15 September 2015 at the Royal College of Physicians for the heritage and cultural sector. The network’s aim is to share information, knowledge, and case studies, and to develop ideas.

The network also brings museums and the cultural sector into consultation with commercial and charity sectors and disabled people. Our over-arching goal: to develop change within the heritage and cultural sector for diversity in the workplace and access to museums for a wider audience.

This is achieved by a website for people to share their projects and experiences, creating a free digital resource to break down barriers. The DCN Twitter account keeps people up to date with the latest news, information, and website updates.  We are planning a blog as part of the site for disabled people to share their experiences of cultural venues.

We are currently collecting more case studies, links and further information including terminology to raise confidence, challenge preconceptions, and break down barriers. We are also developing working relationships with groups, charities and businesses in relation to how they develop networks and support for employers and employees within their businesses. This includes how they identify and challenge barriers to supporting talent in their workplace.

Our aim is to keep the network as accessible as possible without a membership fee so that finances do not become a barrier to participate.

For further information please contact the steering group at info@musedcn.org.uk or visit the Disability Co-operative Network website.

Top 5 Dyslexia Websites

Looking for some top quality dyslexia resources? Check out this list of top five sites culled from our favourites!

top 5 dyslexia websites dybusterUnderstood.org
This site aims to further understanding and awareness of a range of learning differences, including dyslexia. From symptoms to treatments to guidance on talking to your child about dyslexia, this site is a must-visit for dyslexics and their families.

Dyslexic Advantage Blog
A veritable wealth of current information on dyslexia, including federal guidelines for student accommodations, this blog also features inspiring figures with dyslexia. These latter run the gamut from an MIT professor to Mark Ruffalo. Bonus points for a post featuring the one and only Winnie the Pooh. 🙂

TheCodpast.org
How can you resist that name? The Codpast features podcasts on a host of topics from why dyslexics make great secret agents to more education-centered stories for parents.

Dyslexia Help
From the University of Michigan, this site provides useful lists of apps for dyslexia and assistive technology and software. Especially good for locating practical technological aids for learning differences.

Dyslexia Headlines
For keeping up with all the latest dyslexia news, this site is invaluable. A steady stream of news stories that relate to dyslexia appears in the site’s blog stream.

This list definitely is not exhaustive; there are too many great sites out there! What are your favorite dyslexia websites? We are in the middle of re-designing our own dyslexia learning games site; stay tuned for a new look soon!

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