Jobs and Job Hunting Tips for People with Disabilities

Looking for a new job is stressful. When you have a disability, especially one that can’t be seen, it can be even more stressful. You may feel pressured to list your disability on your CV or be fearful of asking for accommodations after you’re hired if you don’t give them a heads up. But many of these fears are unfounded, and there are laws that make the job search less intimidating. There are also tons of jobs that are ideal for people with physical and neurological disabilities.

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How EdTech Is Re-Shaping The Education Landscape

There’s no denying that the landscape of education is changing. With the advent of computers, the internet and mobile phones, there are so many technologies available today that were not present in the 1950s, or even five or ten years ago. A decade ago, the iPad didn’t exist. Now you’ll find them in millions of classrooms around the country.

These new technologies are completely altering the education landscape, from the way students learn to where they are physically located when they consume educational material.

In this article, we’re going to give you the what, why, and how regarding the ways education technology is reshaping the education world, including both the pros and cons.


What is Education Technology?

At a high level, education technology is any kind of technology that is specifically used to promote or enhance education. This could be software, hardware, devices, online programs, servers, cloud storage and so on.

Education technology, often referred to as “EdTech” for short, can be used in many different schools and locations and has been a growing force in education for years.

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Dyscalculia Blog’s New Years Resolutions

The Dyscalculia Blog has just shared a list of New Year’s resolutions that could help you to tackle your learning difficulty. People who have dyslexia also have a 40% chance of having dyscalculia, so it’s worth learning more about it. The resolution list below is a good start to help you make 2019 the best year yet!

Photo by Brooke Lark on Unsplash
Photo by Brooke Lark on Unsplash

Acknowledge the diagnosis and take action

The first step in engaging with a learning difficulty is acknowledging that your brain works differently. However this does not mean that you cannot use that brain to overcome the diagnosis you have. Be confident and take action to tackle your difficulties! There are many ways to train yourself and you can find many tips on this blog.

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You Can Boost Your Concentration Through Music

Photo by Suvan Chowdhury from Pexels

A study done by Stanford University showed that music has a direct link with the brain, affecting areas to do with the memory, making predictions and paying attention. If you are living with dyslexia, this is extremely relevant. The majority of dyslexics have difficulties with attention and concentration, as well as processing. This can result in problems prioritising and completing tasks, as well as an overall feeling of “losing time.” So how can listening to music help with this?

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A Guide To Preparing For Parenthood With A Disability

Photo by bruce mars from Pexels

When you’re expecting a baby, it’s normal to spend hours on end thinking about the ways in which you will have to prepare your life and home for the arrival of a new family member. These anxieties are significantly amplified for expecting parents living with a disability. You may be keenly aware of how to adapt your life to your disability, but it’s not as obvious when you have to consider how a brand new life fits in.

But don’t worry – every parent goes through this. Your disability offers a different sort of challenge, but that doesn’t mean that preparing for parenthood has to be a logistical and emotional ordeal.

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Dyslexia in the Workplace

Photo by Perry Grone on Unsplash

Supporting Dyslexic Workers

Dyslexia isn’t just a challenge faced by children at school. Many professionals in the working world struggle with dyslexia on a daily basis. In fact, over 6 million adults in the U.K., or nearly 15% of the population over the age of 18 have dyslexia. With dyslexia, it can be more difficult to complete work or training sessions in a timely manner, and it can be challenging to connect with fellow employees. It’s crucial that workplaces take steps to help include and support differently abled employees, including those who have been diagnosed with dyslexia. Here are just a few of the ways that employers and co-workers can work to create a warm and welcoming environment for employees with dyslexia.

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How Technology Can Help (And Trouble) Workers With Dyslexia

Photo by Scott Webb on Unsplash

Between 5% and 12%of Europeans have dyslexia or an associated learning disorder, and for those who live with it, dyslexia continues to affect us in adulthood. Technology can be used to help children with dyslexia to work with their condition and develop ways to read and write. But unlike today’s dyslexic youth, adults with dyslexia don’t have any assistive technology specifically designed for them. In today’s online world, the space given by online communication and the speed at which online work-based communication happens can both help and hinder dyslexic adults. While word processors, spell-checkers, and online workspaces can benefit dyslexic adults, it can sometimes be overwhelming to receive information as quickly as it’s given in the ‘information age’.

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Financial Management for Seniors with Dyscalculia

Dyscalculia is a specific developmental disorder defined as difficulty acquiring basic arithmetic skills that is not explained by low intelligence or inadequate schooling. Unsurprisingly, many people with this disorder struggle to manage their finances well enough to build wealth. Seniors with dyscalculia face particular challenges. Dyscalculia does not improve without treatment, and seniors were most likely educated without the awareness of development disorders that has begun to penetrate into the school system in the last few decades. Moreover, these days, financial management often requires the use of technology. Seniors are often less familiar with the technological tools needed and dyscalculia makes it difficult to learn. Here are some tips on financial management when living with dyscalculia.

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The Complete Guide To Safe Internet Use For Seniors With Dyslexia & Dyscalculia

If you are not online, you can forget about keeping in touch with your grandchildren. That is just the reality we are living in. However, for seniors living with dyscalculia or dyslexia, using the internet can be incredibly stressful and even dangerous. To help you with this necessary form of communication, we have put together a comprehensive guide to make the experience less stressful and more fun.

How Dyscalculia and Dyslexia Affects People Later in Life

Most of the media attention on dyscalculia and dyslexia is focused on how these maladies affect youngsters. Yet, older adults also have trouble living a normal life and performing specific activities when they are afflicted by these disabilities. In turn, this can cause undue frustration and stress.

Seniors who acquire dyslexia and dyscalculia later in life often do so through trauma, dementia, stroke, or brain injury. For dementia and stroke, stress is typically a contributing factor. When stress is the source of dyslexia or dyscalculia, a dangerous cycle develops.

As dyscalculics and dyslexics put in extra effort to deal with numbers, math, and reading, they get frustrated and mentally-exhausted. This added stress can lead to other health issues or worsen the condition. Unfortunately, trying to use the internet is one of the more stressful experiences for seniors, especially with all of the scammers out there trying to prey on your inexperience. Thankfully, there are some steps you can take to stay safe on the internet and avoid the added stress.

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Ruskin Mill Trust

Re-imagining Potential

This week we have a guest post from the Ruskin Mill Trust a brilliant organisation who provide specialised bespoke teaching with a focus on practical skills as a form of therapeutic education. This form of education can be beneficial for those with a learning difficulty and certainly will help any student gain the self-confidence to find their place in the world.

‘The measure of success for a student at one of our Ruskin Mill Trust colleges is as wide and diverse as the range of issues and conditions experienced by the young people themselves.’

This is how Aonghus Gordon, the Founder and Executive Chair of Ruskin Mill Trust (RMT), introduced a recent talk about the Vision and Method of RMT, Practical Skills Therapeutic Education.

 Mr. Gordon described three short case studies to show something of the diverse range of outcomes achieved by students at RMT colleges. The first, a student who experiences elective mutism and who continues not to talk who has now learned to express herself confidently through various alternative means of communication. The second, related to a story of a young man who, before attending a RMT college, had been through a series of placement breakdowns and had been a serial non-attender. The student progressed to attending college daily and engaging well with his Study Programme despite always struggling to start the day on time. For the final case study, Mr. Gordon spoke about a student who began his course at a RMT college with no qualifications who has recently graduated from university.

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