Dyscalculia – Spot The Signs

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Signs of Dyscalculia

It’s important to take signs of dyscalculia seriously. At the beginning of school, all children experience occasional difficulties with math. If these problems fail to dissipate with supported homework sessions or additional hours of practice, however, parents and teachers should be on alert for potential dyscalculia.

The following signs can indicate the presence of dyscalculia:


General well-being

  • …has anxiety about going to school
  • …has anxiety about taking tests

  • …has a negative perception of their own intelligence

  • …is withdrawn
  • …expects to fail
  • …displays frustration and a reluctance to try (maths) in other subjects
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Dyslexia – Spot the Signs

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It is important to spot signs of dyslexia early. The earlier this learning difficulty is diagnosed, the sooner an intervention can help children overcome it. This list from Dybuster can help you to identify the first signs that your child may need some help. You can also find more information about dyslexia and dyscalculia on their website.


Signs of Dyslexia

When children are first learning how to read and write, they make the same mistakes at varying degrees of frequency. For most children, the mistakes decrease in frequency after a short time and are eventually eliminated altogether. Children with dyslexia, on the other hand, make a significantly greater number of errors than their peers and the problems persist over a long period of time. What is particularly characteristic of dyslexia is the enormous inconsistency of these errors: it is often difficult to establish regular error patterns, and the errors occur without a common factor or any theme.


The following signs can indicate the presence of dyslexia:

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5 Tips on How to Learn Foreign Language with Dyslexia

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In terms of learning foreign languages, students with dyslexia are often disregarded as those that lack proper abilities to study another language besides their own. Yet, this assumption is rather far-fetched.

According to the Society for Neuroscience, almost 44 million American children and adults have dyslexia, and about 3.5% of American students already receive special education services for their special learning needs. So many U.S. citizens should not be deprived of the opportunity to learn a foreign language because of dyslexia, but many people simply don’t understand the specificity of this learning difficulty.

In general, dyslexia is defined as a specific learning difficulty that influences the way information is perceived. However, it doesn’t necessarily mean that a child or an adult with dyslexia cannot learn a foreign language. Dyslexia can have a significant impact on writing and reading skills, as it affects the way how information is perceived, organised, sequenced and stored, which can be difficult, taking into account that a good memory is a prerequisite of learning a foreign language successfully.

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Top 3 Speed Reading Tips for Dyslexic Readers

Dyslexia is a learning disability. It affects a person’s abilities with reading, writing, and spelling. A person with dyslexia may find it difficult to recognise sounds of certain words and letters, correct spellings, difficulty in understanding sequence of directions, they find it difficult to understand information or instructions that are written down then told verbally, and they get confused between certain letters like ‘b’ and’. However, people with dyslexia are good at creative thinking and problem-solving skills. Everyone should understand that dyslexia is not related to a person’s intelligence level but their ability with learning.

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“Child Burnout and Media Consumption” – How Too Much of a Good Thing Can Lead to Burnout.

The new school year is in full swing and unfortunately so are the growing pressures on the students. Burnout versus enjoying Life – a balancing act that now also affects children.

Both Assessments of Health Promotion Switzerland and the Pro Juventute work together with university hospitals for child and adolescent psychiatry in Bern and Zurich and state: children are increasingly overwhelmed with their everyday coping. Stress, pressure, sleep disorders and listlessness are commonly observed fatigue symptoms. Some experts even fear that every third student has burnout symptoms.

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Hands Up! Why We Should Promote Visual Arithmetic

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It is well known that schools tend to put mental arithmetic skills above the visual ones, as something like counting with your fingers is seen as a weakness in one’s calculation abilities. Educators and scientists have been tackling this obsolete cliché with research and scientific reports that seem to prove that visual aids are more than just helpful in the learning process.

Indeed, visual aids, such as the use of fingers, have a key role in children’s understanding of mathematics. This form of visualisation gives the abstract world of numbers a real side and establishes a connection to something tangible. This results in the creation connections from the prefrontal cortex (main memory / data centre) to the visual and motor cortex. Thus, when visual aid is used, thinking becomes outsourced to other brain areas generating a more efficient use the brain’s capacity.

However, these findings do not mean that you child will forever use their fingers to count. Over time a mental image of the fingers will become connected to the mental processes of counting, making the physical counting unnecessary. This is proven by numerous studies with primary school children that measured increased activity in the visual cortex while children were solving complex math tasks, even when they did not use their hands.

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Dyscalculia Resources For Those Going To High School

Now I’m sure every parent goes through the stressful shift from primary school to high school and the fears of this change being to much for their child, but there is extra pressure for those with children that have learning difficulties. This is because there will always be a difference between the support your child received at primary school and what’s available at the high school. So we have prepared a list of recommended resources that are suitable for this transition period and for supporting your child throughout their time in high school.

  1. ‘TES’ is always a good place to look for any resource you may need, but this collection is also especially for those with dyscalculia. These are not just for teachers; they are useful for those homeschooling or even just that little bit of extra after school or weekend boost for your child.

  2. ‘Helping With Math’ is another good site for all your mathematical resources, this site is especially great because of huge collection of exercises available for free, and while the resources may not be the most beautiful, they are extremely useful.

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Dyscalculia: After The Diagnosis

If you or your child have just been diagnosed with dyscalculia, the first question you might ask is: “So now what?”

We’ve put together a list of online resources that can help guide you through the post-diagnosis phase. Ready?

Let’s start the journey:

Quick overview

If you need some quick guidance on what to expect and what steps to take, have a look this resource from Understood: My Child Was Just Diagnosed With Dyscalculia Now What?

The article takes the reader through nine steps on what do after a child has been diagnosed with dyscalculia. From exploring therapies to liaising with schools, to how to talk to the child itself, the article provides concrete tips on these and more issues.

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Top 10 Best Back to School Resources for Teachers

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School is here and its not just the students who need to prepare for their return its also the teachers! So Dybuster has compiled a helpful list of the top ten online resources for all you educators out there enabling you and your students to have a great start to the year.

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