Here’s How Art Can Benefit Children And Adults With Dyslexia

Art has the power to bring people together, regardless of skin colour, gender identity, politics, language, and other factors that may keep us divided. Moreover, it can make an impact on a person’s life as art can contribute to one’s overall development and happiness. For children and adults with dyslexia, it can be a way for healthy self-expression using their enhanced visual and intuitive abilities. Many dyslexics gravitate towards art, and recent research has found that there is a high incidence of dyslexia among artistically gifted individuals. Apart from being a productive way to pass the time, art comes with a host of benefits that can improve one’s health and wellbeing–these are all the ways art can benefit children and adults with dyslexia. 

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How Technology Can Help (And Trouble) Workers With Dyslexia

Photo by Scott Webb on Unsplash

Between 5% and 12%of Europeans have dyslexia or an associated learning disorder, and for those who live with it, dyslexia continues to affect us in adulthood. Technology can be used to help children with dyslexia to work with their condition and develop ways to read and write. But unlike today’s dyslexic youth, adults with dyslexia don’t have any assistive technology specifically designed for them. In today’s online world, the space given by online communication and the speed at which online work-based communication happens can both help and hinder dyslexic adults. While word processors, spell-checkers, and online workspaces can benefit dyslexic adults, it can sometimes be overwhelming to receive information as quickly as it’s given in the ‘information age’.

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The Complete Guide To Safe Internet Use For Seniors With Dyslexia & Dyscalculia

If you are not online, you can forget about keeping in touch with your grandchildren. That is just the reality we are living in. However, for seniors living with dyscalculia or dyslexia, using the internet can be incredibly stressful and even dangerous. To help you with this necessary form of communication, we have put together a comprehensive guide to make the experience less stressful and more fun.


How Dyscalculia and Dyslexia Affects People Later in Life

Most of the media attention on dyscalculia and dyslexia is focused on how these maladies affect youngsters. Yet, older adults also have trouble living a normal life and performing specific activities when they are afflicted by these disabilities. In turn, this can cause undue frustration and stress.

Seniors who acquire dyslexia and dyscalculia later in life often do so through trauma, dementia, stroke, or brain injury. For dementia and stroke, stress is typically a contributing factor. When stress is the source of dyslexia or dyscalculia, a dangerous cycle develops.

As dyscalculics and dyslexics put in extra effort to deal with numbers, math, and reading, they get frustrated and mentally-exhausted. This added stress can lead to other health issues or worsen the condition. Unfortunately, trying to use the internet is one of the more stressful experiences for seniors, especially with all of the scammers out there trying to prey on your inexperience. Thankfully, there are some steps you can take to stay safe on the internet and avoid the added stress.

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Dyscalculia: After The Diagnosis

If you or your child have just been diagnosed with dyscalculia, the first question you might ask is: “So now what?”

We’ve put together a list of online resources that can help guide you through the post-diagnosis phase. Ready?

Let’s start the journey:


Quick overview

If you need some quick guidance on what to expect and what steps to take, have a look this resource from Understood: My Child Was Just Diagnosed With Dyscalculia Now What?

The article takes the reader through nine steps on what do after a child has been diagnosed with dyscalculia. From exploring therapies to liaising with schools, to how to talk to the child itself, the article provides concrete tips on these and more issues.

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Dyscalculia & Maths Resources for Adults

It can be difficult to find much about or for adults on the subject of dyscalculia, previously the Dyscalculia Blog had a great guest post from educator Sarah Jarvis covering the topic of Helping Adults with Mathematical Learning Difficulties, which is a great introduction to the subject if you have not read it yet.

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Our Top 5 Blog Posts on Dyscalculia

Numbers falling down in front of woman's face Dyscalculia

Dyscalculia is a learning disorder that causes those who have it to struggle with numbers and math.

Though gradually gaining in exposure, dyscalculia remains less well-known than dyslexia, a learning difference affecting the ability to map written to spoken language. Our blog aims to increase awareness of dyscalculia and point readers to further resources and information.

This week we have researched which of our blog posts on dyscalculia have proved most helpful to readers. We would like to share our top 5 picks based on number of visits and what search terms led readers to a specific post, which tells us a bit about what information the readers were looking for.

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