Our Top 5 Blog Posts on Dyscalculia

Numbers falling down in front of woman's face Dyscalculia

Dyscalculia is a learning disorder that causes those who have it to struggle with numbers and math.

Though gradually gaining in exposure, dyscalculia remains less well-known than dyslexia, a learning difference affecting the ability to map written to spoken language. Our blog aims to increase awareness of dyscalculia and point readers to further resources and information.

This week we have researched which of our blog posts on dyscalculia have proved most helpful to readers. We would like to share our top 5 picks based on number of visits and what search terms led readers to a specific post, which tells us a bit about what information the readers were looking for.

Continue reading Our Top 5 Blog Posts on Dyscalculia

Signs & Symptoms of Dyscalculia

Dyscalculia receives less press than does dyslexia. Parents and teachers may not even be aware that dyscalculia exists, much less recognise what could be signs of the learning difference. We’ve put together a list of things to watch out for if you think your child may have a learning disability in math.

Some of these signs are more established through research while others have been reported by teachers, parents, or dyscalculics themselves.

Signs of dyscalculia

  • Slowness in learning to count
  • Difficulty in comparing quantities (larger vs. smaller)
  • Difficulty in recognising quantities, even small numbers of objects
  • Difficulty in understanding “math words” such as “greater” or “less than”
  • Lagging behind peers in learning simple arithmetic such as easy addition
  • Reliance on slow methods of performing math, such as counting on fingers for addition or adding up numbers for multiplication
  • Difficulty in telling time from an analog clock
  • Difficulty in keeping track of time
  • Inability to count out change or estimate costs
  • Anxiety when faced with number-related tasks; math anxiety

The presence of one or more of these signs does not necessarily add up to a dyscalculia diagnosis.

If you think your child or student may have a learning disability then an evaluation from a professional is a key step to getting a child the support that he or she needs. But with this list perhaps educators and parents can become more aware of dyscalculia and how it affects children at home and in the classroom.

More information is available on sites such as Understood.org, the Learning Disabilities Association of America, and the British Dyslexia Association. You can also contact us for information on our intervention software for dyscalculia.