Simple But Effective Ways To Make Your Website More Accessible For People With Dyslexia

Over 10% of the European population are living with dyslexia: an estimated 45 million citizens. As Europe’s most widespread learning difficulty, it impacts a significant portion of the population, many of whom may not be diagnosed. Europe and the internet are currently not accommodating for people with learning disabilities like dyslexia. This makes daily life considerably more difficult and may lead to anxiety or confidence issues. Furthermore, the co-occurrence rate of dyslexia with other learning difficulties like dyscalculia is quite high, indicating a definite association. This means that for many living with dyslexia, dyscalculia or anxiety may further compound issues and make education and daily life even more difficult. However, there are simple approaches to web design that can help make sites more accessible for those with dyslexia.

Continue reading Simple But Effective Ways To Make Your Website More Accessible For People With Dyslexia

FREE DIGITAL LEARNING LEARNING AT HOME, DURING THE CORONAVIRUS CRISIS

To support schools and their pupils during the worrying times of the coronavirus pandemic, we are now offering our Combo School licence with the multi-sensory learning programs Orthograph (spelling) and Calcularis (mathematics) for free for the next 4 months.

This means that up to of your pupils* will have access to our browser-based learning programs until July 31st, 2020.

Continue reading FREE DIGITAL LEARNING LEARNING AT HOME, DURING THE CORONAVIRUS CRISIS

Popular Math Apps in the Resource Classroom: Why I Chose Not To Use Them

This is a guest article from Special Education Teacher Monise Seward, you can find out more about her work on her website – http://www.moniseseward.com/

For the last 8 months, my IG and Twitter posts have focused on two main goals; find (a) Dyscalculia and Dyslexia training; and (b) Math Apps and/or curriculum designed with my students’ needs in mind. Both proved to be challenging and time-consuming endeavours, eventually I found one.

Dyscalculia is the Learning Disability you’ve probably never heard of, despite the fact that 5-10% of the population has it. Based on the challenges non-identified students experience, I believe there are more kids (and adults) with Dyscalculia. We simply characterize their struggles as ‘Math anxiety’; at least, in this country. Based on conversations had with U.S. teachers, few are aware of the existence of Dyscalculia. They are unable to identify the characteristics exhibited by students who may have it. Compounded by a lack of training on Dyscalculia, many teachers adhere to a pacing guide that does not allow time for remediation or accommodations.

Continue reading Popular Math Apps in the Resource Classroom: Why I Chose Not To Use Them

Dyscalculia – Spot The Signs

Photo by Joanna Kosinska on Unsplash

Signs of Dyscalculia

It’s important to take signs of dyscalculia seriously. At the beginning of school, all children experience occasional difficulties with math. If these problems fail to dissipate with supported homework sessions or additional hours of practice, however, parents and teachers should be on alert for potential dyscalculia.

The following signs can indicate the presence of dyscalculia:


General well-being

  • …has anxiety about going to school
  • …has anxiety about taking tests

  • …has a negative perception of their own intelligence

  • …is withdrawn
  • …expects to fail
  • …displays frustration and a reluctance to try (maths) in other subjects
Continue reading Dyscalculia – Spot The Signs

Dyscalculia – Identifying and Addressing it in Daily Life

Are you wondering why your child struggles with numbers and finds it difficult to solve the seemingly simple tasks?

Photo by Crissy Jarvis on Unsplash

Understanding Dyscalculia

Dyscalculia is usually perceived as a specific learning difficulty for mathematics, or, more appropriately, arithmetic. In isolated dyscalculia, there are no deficits in reading or writing. Dyscalculia is classified under WHO ICD-10, a classification system for diseases and mental disorders, as:


“The deficit concerns mastery of basic computational skills of
addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division rather than of the more
abstract mathematical skills involved in algebra, trigonometry,
geometry, or calculus.”


Continue reading Dyscalculia – Identifying and Addressing it in Daily Life

Open call – Looking for Schools to Trial Calcularis and Orthograph!

Great news!

We are looking for primary schools in the UK to trial our Dybuster softwares! You will receive the softwares for free for the duration of the 1 to 3 months. These softwares will help your pupils to tackle their learning difficulties such as dyslexia and dyscalculia in an interactive and fun way. There is no obligation to subscribe afterwards, but we would love some feedback! Interested?

Contact us here

Developmental Dyscalculia

Photo by Samuel Zeller on Unsplash

What is Developmental Dyscalculia?

Developmental dyscalculia can be either genetic or environmental and even an interaction of the two. It is a specific learning disability that affects the normal acquisition of arithmetic skills. It is equally common in boys and girls and impacts on 5-6% of the population.

Genetic Causes

Genetic causes include known genetic disorders such as Turner’s syndrome, Fragile X syndrome, Velocardiofacial syndrome, Williams syndrome. In addition studies suggest that there are genes present in the general population which increase the risk of dyscalculia.

Continue reading Developmental Dyscalculia

Financial Management for Seniors with Dyscalculia

Dyscalculia is a specific developmental disorder defined as difficulty acquiring basic arithmetic skills that is not explained by low intelligence or inadequate schooling. Unsurprisingly, many people with this disorder struggle to manage their finances well enough to build wealth. Seniors with dyscalculia face particular challenges. Dyscalculia does not improve without treatment, and seniors were most likely educated without the awareness of development disorders that has begun to penetrate into the school system in the last few decades. Moreover, these days, financial management often requires the use of technology. Seniors are often less familiar with the technological tools needed and dyscalculia makes it difficult to learn. Here are some tips on financial management when living with dyscalculia.

Continue reading Financial Management for Seniors with Dyscalculia

Dyscalculia Resources For Those Going To High School

Photo by Drew Beamer on Unsplash

Now I’m sure every parent goes through the stressful shift from primary school to high school and the fears of this change being too much for their child, but there is extra pressure for those with children that have learning difficulties. This is because there will always be a difference between the support your child received at primary school and what’s available at the high school. So we have prepared a list of recommended resources that are suitable for this transition period and for supporting your child throughout their time in high school.

Continue reading Dyscalculia Resources For Those Going To High School

The Complete Guide To Safe Internet Use For Seniors With Dyslexia & Dyscalculia

If you are not online, you can forget about keeping in touch with your grandchildren. That is just the reality we are living in. However, for seniors living with dyscalculia or dyslexia, using the internet can be incredibly stressful and even dangerous. To help you with this necessary form of communication, we have put together a comprehensive guide to make the experience less stressful and more fun.


How Dyscalculia and Dyslexia Affects People Later in Life

Most of the media attention on dyscalculia and dyslexia is focused on how these maladies affect youngsters. Yet, older adults also have trouble living a normal life and performing specific activities when they are afflicted by these disabilities. In turn, this can cause undue frustration and stress.

Seniors who acquire dyslexia and dyscalculia later in life often do so through trauma, dementia, stroke, or brain injury. For dementia and stroke, stress is typically a contributing factor. When stress is the source of dyslexia or dyscalculia, a dangerous cycle develops.

As dyscalculics and dyslexics put in extra effort to deal with numbers, math, and reading, they get frustrated and mentally-exhausted. This added stress can lead to other health issues or worsen the condition. Unfortunately, trying to use the internet is one of the more stressful experiences for seniors, especially with all of the scammers out there trying to prey on your inexperience. Thankfully, there are some steps you can take to stay safe on the internet and avoid the added stress.

Continue reading The Complete Guide To Safe Internet Use For Seniors With Dyslexia & Dyscalculia