Dybuster’s Top 5 Blog Posts on Dyslexia

Dyslexia is a learning disorder that results in reading and writing difficulties. Dyslexia is found in populations around the world but rates can be particularly high in countries where the written language uses irregular spelling or features combinations of letters with different sound possibilities. English is full of these combinations (such as the ou in cough and through) as well as different spellings that all make the same sound (such as the o sound in stole, coal, and bowl). It is estimated that 15% of the U.S. population suffers from dyslexia.

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Our Top 5 Blog Posts on Dyscalculia

Numbers falling down in front of woman's face Dyscalculia

Dyscalculia is a learning disorder that causes those who have it to struggle with numbers and math.

Though gradually gaining in exposure, dyscalculia remains less well-known than dyslexia, a learning difference affecting the ability to map written to spoken language. Our blog aims to increase awareness of dyscalculia and point readers to further resources and information.

This week we have researched which of our blog posts on dyscalculia have proved most helpful to readers. We would like to share our top 5 picks based on number of visits and what search terms led readers to a specific post, which tells us a bit about what information the readers were looking for.

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Dybuster User Studies: How Effective is Orthograph?

Dybuster‘s software Orthograph was developed in collaboration with the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology. The principles behind the software came from neuroscience and computer science. An important part of the development process was rigorous user testing: how well did the software actually work? Did Orthograph really help dyslexics improve their spelling and reading?


First case study

The first study on Dybuster software was published in 2007. Eighty children between the ages of nine and eleven took part in the study, which was led by neuropsychologists Prof. Dr. Lutz Jäncke and Prof. M. Meyer. The participants included both children with dyslexia and children without.

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