FREE DIGITAL LEARNING FOR SCHOOLS DURING THE CORONAVIRUS CRISIS

To support schools and their pupils during the worrying times of the coronavirus pandemic, we have extended our offer of the Combo School licence with the multi-sensory learning programs Orthograph (spelling) and Calcularis (mathematics) for free.

This means that up to 500 of your pupils* will have access to our browser-based learning programs until December 31st, 2020.


We are committed to providing educational access to our learning programmes for all schools, thus enabling “digital learning” for all children whether they are shielding at home or back in school.

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Here’s How Art Can Benefit Children And Adults With Dyslexia

Art has the power to bring people together, regardless of skin colour, gender identity, politics, language, and other factors that may keep us divided. Moreover, it can make an impact on a person’s life as art can contribute to one’s overall development and happiness. For children and adults with dyslexia, it can be a way for healthy self-expression using their enhanced visual and intuitive abilities. Many dyslexics gravitate towards art, and recent research has found that there is a high incidence of dyslexia among artistically gifted individuals. Apart from being a productive way to pass the time, art comes with a host of benefits that can improve one’s health and wellbeing–these are all the ways art can benefit children and adults with dyslexia. 

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FREE DIGITAL LEARNING LEARNING AT HOME, DURING THE CORONAVIRUS CRISIS

To support schools and their pupils during the worrying times of the coronavirus pandemic, we are now offering our Combo School licence with the multi-sensory learning programs Orthograph (spelling) and Calcularis (mathematics) for free for the next 4 months.

This means that up to of your pupils* will have access to our browser-based learning programs until July 31st, 2020.

Continue reading FREE DIGITAL LEARNING LEARNING AT HOME, DURING THE CORONAVIRUS CRISIS

Dybuster User Studies: How Effective is Orthograph?

Dybuster‘s software Orthograph was developed in collaboration with the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology. The principles behind the software came from neuroscience and computer science. An important part of the development process was rigorous user testing: how well did the software actually work? Did Orthograph really help dyslexics improve their spelling and reading?


First case study

The first study on Dybuster software was published in 2007. Eighty children between the ages of nine and eleven took part in the study, which was led by neuropsychologists Prof. Dr. Lutz Jäncke and Prof. M. Meyer. The participants included both children with dyslexia and children without.

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Signs & Symptoms of Dyscalculia

Dyscalculia receives less press than does dyslexia. Parents and teachers may not even be aware that dyscalculia exists, much less recognise what could be signs of the learning difference. We’ve put together a list of things to watch out for if you think your child may have a learning disability in math.

Some of these signs are more established through research while others have been reported by teachers, parents, or dyscalculics themselves.

Signs of dyscalculia

  • Slowness in learning to count
  • Difficulty in comparing quantities (larger vs. smaller)
  • Difficulty in recognising quantities, even small numbers of objects
  • Difficulty in understanding “math words” such as “greater” or “less than”
  • Lagging behind peers in learning simple arithmetic such as easy addition
  • Reliance on slow methods of performing math, such as counting on fingers for addition or adding up numbers for multiplication
  • Difficulty in telling time from an analog clock
  • Difficulty in keeping track of time
  • Inability to count out change or estimate costs
  • Anxiety when faced with number-related tasks; math anxiety

The presence of one or more of these signs does not necessarily add up to a dyscalculia diagnosis.

If you think your child or student may have a learning disability then an evaluation from a professional is a key step to getting a child the support that he or she needs. But with this list perhaps educators and parents can become more aware of dyscalculia and how it affects children at home and in the classroom.

More information is available on sites such as Understood.org, the Learning Disabilities Association of America, and the British Dyslexia Association. You can also contact us for information on our intervention software for dyscalculia.