Our Top 5 Blog Posts on Dyscalculia

Numbers falling down in front of woman's face Dyscalculia

Dyscalculia is a learning disorder that causes those who have it to struggle with numbers and math.

Though gradually gaining in exposure, dyscalculia remains less well-known than dyslexia, a learning difference affecting the ability to map written to spoken language. Our blog aims to increase awareness of dyscalculia and point readers to further resources and information.

This week we have researched which of our blog posts on dyscalculia have proved most helpful to readers. We would like to share our top 5 picks based on number of visits and what search terms led readers to a specific post, which tells us a bit about what information the readers were looking for.

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6 Tips to Make Maths Fun!

Most children find mathematics interesting and to encourage their interest is simpler than you think, as mathematics is a big part of everyday life. In this article we are offering you some ideas, how to create a playful link between mathematics and daily routine.

Photo Credit: Kotatsu Neko 808 Flickr via Compfight cc

Continue reading 6 Tips to Make Maths Fun!

Our top 5 Blog Posts on Dyscalculia

Dyscalculia is a learning disorder that causes those who have it to struggle with numbers and math.

Our top blog posts on dyscalculia. Find out more about this learning difference that causes difficulty in solving math problems.
Our top blog posts on dyscalculia. Read on to find out about this learning difference that causes difficulty in solving math problems.

Though gradually gaining in exposure, dyscalculia remains less well-known than dyslexia, a learning difference affecting the ability to map written to spoken language. Our blog aims to increase awareness of dyscalculia and point readers to further resources and information.

This week we have researched which of our blog posts on dyscalculia have proved most helpful to readers. We would like to share our top 5 picks based on number of visits and what search terms led readers to a specific post, which tells us a bit about what information the readers were looking for.

1. Dyscalculics: the famous, the successful, the inspiring

Our top post focuses on well-known dyscalculics, leading us to think that there is a need for spotlighting dyscalculic role models. Singer Cher and actress Mary Tyler Moore make the list of famous people with dyscalculia.

Continue reading Our top 5 Blog Posts on Dyscalculia

Signs & Symptoms of Dyscalculia

Dyscalculia receives less press than does dyslexia. Parents and teachers may not even be aware that dyscalculia exists, much less recognise what could be signs of the learning difference. We’ve put together a list of things to watch out for if you think your child may have a learning disability in math.

Some of these signs are more established through research while others have been reported by teachers, parents, or dyscalculics themselves.

Signs of dyscalculia

  • Slowness in learning to count
  • Difficulty in comparing quantities (larger vs. smaller)
  • Difficulty in recognising quantities, even small numbers of objects
  • Difficulty in understanding “math words” such as “greater” or “less than”
  • Lagging behind peers in learning simple arithmetic such as easy addition
  • Reliance on slow methods of performing math, such as counting on fingers for addition or adding up numbers for multiplication
  • Difficulty in telling time from an analog clock
  • Difficulty in keeping track of time
  • Inability to count out change or estimate costs
  • Anxiety when faced with number-related tasks; math anxiety

The presence of one or more of these signs does not necessarily add up to a dyscalculia diagnosis.

If you think your child or student may have a learning disability then an evaluation from a professional is a key step to getting a child the support that he or she needs. But with this list perhaps educators and parents can become more aware of dyscalculia and how it affects children at home and in the classroom.

More information is available on sites such as Understood.org, the Learning Disabilities Association of America, and the British Dyslexia Association. You can also contact us for information on our intervention software for dyscalculia.

The Roots of Math Anxiety

It’s a vicious cycle. When faced with a number problem you are gripped by anxiety or panic. Clearly, these feelings are no good so you go out of your way to avoid number problems as much as possible. This leads to your becoming less and less “good at math” and the feelings of anxiety increase. Round and round you go until your math anxiety has become a fact of life for you.

math anxiety dybuster blog

Research is currently delving into possible causes of and intervention for math anxiety. One article from youcubed at Stanford University reports that timed tests may be responsible for math anxiety in some cases. Other research at the University of Chicago conducted by psychologist Sian Beilock found that math-anxious parents can pass on this anxiety to their children. A first-person account from a New York Times reporter confirmed this, and mentioned as well the enormous effect of teachers can have on a student’s math anxiety. Still, other factors such as stereotype threat can severely and adversely affect students’ performance on math exams. And of course, math learning disabilities such as dyscalculia can result in a child feeling intense anxiety when asked to deal with numbers.

What possibilities exist for breaking out of the cycle of anxiety-avoidance-poor performance? A recent experiment at Stanford University found that one-on-one tutoring alleviated math anxiety in students by using techniques based on exposure therapy. Students faced their fears of math in a supportive environment and gradually those fears lessened. Breathing techniques for older students at university have also been found to be effective. In the case of a learning disability then early intervention can be key in lessening anxiety caused by numbers.

Are you familiar with math anxiety? Can you trace the anxiety to specific causes? What’s your story?