The Challenges Of Working From Home With Dyslexia — And What Can Be Done To Help

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Globally, 70% of people work remotely at least once a week, according to a study by Zug released in 2018. However, despite the abundance of options for many to choose remote work opportunities, as well as the rising popularity of doing so nowadays, those who live with dyslexia and find themselves working from home may face additional difficulties that can make the experience more difficult. Thankfully, there are a number of ways that working remotely can be adapted to fit one’s specific needs in order to ensure the best opportunity for success.

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Dyslexia in the Workplace

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Supporting Dyslexic Workers

Dyslexia isn’t just a challenge faced by children at school. Many professionals in the working world struggle with dyslexia on a daily basis. In fact, over 6 million adults in the U.K., or nearly 15% of the population over the age of 18 have dyslexia. With dyslexia, it can be more difficult to complete work or training sessions in a timely manner, and it can be challenging to connect with fellow employees. It’s crucial that workplaces take steps to help include and support differently abled employees, including those who have been diagnosed with dyslexia. Here are just a few of the ways that employers and co-workers can work to create a warm and welcoming environment for employees with dyslexia.

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How Technology Can Help (And Trouble) Workers With Dyslexia

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Between 5% and 12%of Europeans have dyslexia or an associated learning disorder, and for those who live with it, dyslexia continues to affect us in adulthood. Technology can be used to help children with dyslexia to work with their condition and develop ways to read and write. But unlike today’s dyslexic youth, adults with dyslexia don’t have any assistive technology specifically designed for them. In today’s online world, the space given by online communication and the speed at which online work-based communication happens can both help and hinder dyslexic adults. While word processors, spell-checkers, and online workspaces can benefit dyslexic adults, it can sometimes be overwhelming to receive information as quickly as it’s given in the ‘information age’.

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